Courgettes with Challah

Courgettes with Challah

Zucchinis stewed in a lemony, herb infused oil. Delicious hot or cold, especially mopped up with challah bread made by my daughter! I’ve tried this recipe twice, so I’m confident about sharing it with my fellow foodies. If you have too many courgettes/zucchinis lying around, this is a great way to use them up.

First, sprinkle cubed zukes (about 3-4 cups) generously with coarse salt and let drain an hour or overnight in a colander. I used some yellow squash as well. 

Bring to boil: 1.25 cups water, 0.5 cup olive oil, juice of one lemon, crushed garlic cloves, some dry thyme and a bay leaf. Coarsely crush some black pepper corns, whole coriander seeds and fennel. (The fennel seeds were harvested from my garden. I’m still puzzling over why I didn’t get any fennel bulbs, though?). Add to the oil-water-lemony broth.

Add the cubed zucchini and 2-3 chopped tomatoes. I added a small handful of black raisins for a touch of sweetness and contrasting color. Let boil briskly for 15-20 minutes. The liquid thickens into a lovely, fragrant broth with a glossy finish. Top it off with some olives..I used the green pimento-filled ones which were rather bland, so I think the black Kalamata olives would be a better match. 

You’ll have to ask Anjana for the challah recipe 🙂

Bon Appetit! 

Credit: http://vegeyum.wordpress.com/2014/02/06/zucchini-in-oil/

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83 Responses to Courgettes with Challah

  1. Jesse H says:


    Whoohoo !!! I like that. Next time get the green olives filled with garlic. The best ones to get are from a company in Florida. If only I could remember who it was Rajini

  2. Jim Carver says:


    Oh boy, that looks good. I didn’t do a garden this year, too dry. I can’t even pump out of the pond, scared it’s going to dry up and we’d lose the fish.

  3. Rajini Rao says:


    Jesse H they sound tasty! I’ll have to look out for them. The ones I used were blah, but perhaps their flavor will develop in the lemony oil. 

  4. Rajini Rao says:


    Jim Carver on the other hand, we had a surprisingly pleasant summer. I’ve never grown fennel before and basically it just grew luxurious fronds and flowers that went to seed, but there was nothing going on underground 🙂


    Psst.. Michelle Beissel can you help? 

  5. Jesse H says:


    I hope they do but from my experience the pimento loses most of it’s taste for some reason

  6. Rajini Rao says:


    Jesse H You may be right. I look at pimento-stuffed olives as something pretty but tasteless. 

  7. Jim Carver says:


    Rajini Rao Fall is for herbs down here, it’s really nice this time of year in north Texas. We usually don’t get a frost until after Thanksgiving. My Thai basil is blooming and the peppermint is loving the weather. It doesn’t care though as long as you keep it watered…I’ve got it in a big pot, but I’m going to set part of it free. They say mint in invasive, if you have a lot of rain I guess, but who really cares…I’d rather have mint as grass. 🙂

  8. Jesse H says:


    Black olives seem to have more flavor but I can’t get near them. Hahaha. Might be a personal problem of mine.

  9. Rajini Rao says:


    Mint is terribly invasive here! I have a pretty variegated kind in a raised bed and it has outcompeted all the other herbs 🙂 Sometimes I dig around and find some oregano in the “mint understory”. The rosemary didn’t even put up a fight and quietly disappeared. 

  10. Rajini Rao says:


    Jesse H I’ll have to remember that if we ever HIRL* at some time 🙂


    *hangout in real life

  11. Pam Adger says:


    Rajini Rao Yeah…it gets it’s own pot. 

  12. Jesse H says:


    Hmmmm. I just ate too

  13. Jim Carver says:


    Rajini Rao I guess given a level plying field, mint out competes its cousins. What I am growing is peppermint, but I have grown spearmint and it seems to be drought hardy. Peppermint doesn’t make seeds so it’s pretty easy to keep it in check, propagating by runners, (stolons?).  

  14. Rajini Rao says:


    Shaker Cherukuri then you would love this 🙂

  15. Jim Carver says:


    A piece of pickled sweet onion would be good in an olive also.


    …I see everyone ran off to go eat…:)

  16. Rajini Rao says:


    Shaker Cherukuri yes, I used yellow squash in this recipe and it tasted great. 

  17. Brian Peters says:


    Looks close to my wife’s Chuchuka.

  18. Rajini Rao says:


    Brian Peters I had to google that 🙂


    So chuchuka is a tomato/roasted red pepper stew? https://dcvegetarian.wordpress.com/tag/chuchuka/ 

  19. Jim Carver says:


    Mmm, chickpea leek soup and squash with tomatoes and peppers.

  20. Mony Obry says:


    My favorite type of dish! Too bad my zucchinis have frozen a long time ago…btw, we have the same problem with mint and oregano, they invaded the lawn!

  21. Rajini Rao says:


    Jim Carver that soup recipe in the link does look good! 

  22. Rajini Rao says:


    Mony Obry we have had a few ‘herbal escapees’ as well, although the grass around the veggie beds is hardly refined enough to be called a “lawn” 😀

  23. Jim Carver says:


    Mony Obry You, have a lawn? It’s so dry here the grasshoppers left for greener pastures.

  24. Paul M says:


    Anjana’s challah is beautiful! I’m enjoying the photo on my new iPad. It really pops!

  25. Rajini Rao says:


    I’ll be sure to pass along your compliments to her, Paul M and Shinae Choi Robinson ! Actually, she did suggest making some French Toast for her brother with the challah 🙂


  26. Rajini Rao , the herb fennel and the bulb fennel are two different plants; it seems you have the herb.

  27. Rajini Rao says:


    Michelle Beissel well, I’m just gob smacked!! Thank you 😀 


    Are they named differently then? 

  28. Rajini Rao says:


    So, there is bulb fennel and herb fennel but they’re names are very similar: “Wild fennel which can reach almost two meters and does not produce a bulb is Foeniculum vulgare, cultivated fennel or Florence fennel is Foeniculum vulgare var. azoricum and the sweet fennel is Foeniculum vulgare var. dulce.” I guess that’s my fennel word on this confusion 🙂

  29. Jim Carver says:


    Tell the truth, I’ve only ever used the seeds. Not sure which one that would be commonly.


    Probably the one that makes the most seeds. 😉

  30. prem mundada says:


    Hi Happy DIWALI 🎆 Rajini Rao lots of sweets. …..good night


  31. Happy Diwali to you! That looks Yummy.

  32. Adit Morey says:


    Yummy! Bon appetit! Mama Mia! Lecker! The Courgettes and the Challah bread look very yummy.


    But I can’t help but feel that Challah is a type of bread prepared in a west Asian country like Lebanon or Morocco – maybe because of how it sounds when spoken.


  33. ㄹ룡ㅈㅍ춑ㄱㅎ야춍젗튜텨텰ㄹ구모ㅓ너너옄ㅎ저ㅠ더ㅠㅏ뉵펴


  34. ㅗ오혀허ㅓㅏㅏㅓ모ㅠㅠㅕㅎㅇ어ㅜㅑㅠㅎㅊㄹ교ㅑㅑㅏㅠㅗㅊㄹㄴ마ㅡㅜㅠㅍㄹㅋ다ㅜㅗㅊㄹㄹㄷ다ㅜㅑㅠㅗㅍ어ㅜㅍㅎㅊ투ㅠㅓㅠㅊㅍㄹ서ㅏㅜㅑ


  35. Rajini Rao ,  Florence fennel or finocchio is the variety/cultivar of Foeniculum vulgare (not to be confused with giant fennel which belongs to the Ferula genus and therefore is not true fennel) that’s produces a bulb in addition to the aromatic foliage and seeds.


    I have the non bulb type in our garden which I love so very much because of its beautiful, fragrant foliage which I use in flower arrangements and in cooking.  The seeds when fresh and green are anise-like and when older, drier, and brown, more like caraway. The yellow, edible flowers also contribute to their value.


    After the first flush of growth in the spring, about early summer, I cut what has become a seven-foot plant almost down to the base and new growth occurs giving me fresh foliage until November.


    Gun to head, I would say fennel along with lovage, both perennial herbs, are the best culinary plants in our garden. The bulb fennel is a cool-weather perennial hence it would act like an annual in our climate which is characterised by a long, hot growing season.

  36. Satyr Icon says:


    I’d be hungry for that even if I had a full stomach!


  37. ㄹㅅ쿼ㅜ슈ㅗㅠ나즈허뉴ㅗㅠ거ㅠㅗㅠ더랴모ㅗㅗ다ㅡ너우로ㅗ쟈ㅠ겨놋

  38. Satyr Icon says:


    The bread looks just the type of bread to soak up and sop up the juices too.


  39. 라ㅠㅎ곃가너러넛뉴렄ㅎ구서ㅓㅏ나구오라무우루ㅜ뮤ㅗㄹ


  40. Zucchini is toree, right? And yellow squash is kaddu, right? Hmm, must try this.


    Normally, we pressure cook our torees and kaddus.

  41. Rajini Rao says:


    Thanks for the Diwali greetings Rashmi Pahuja and prem mundada . I’ve not celebrated properly in years..miss all the fun (and food!). 

  42. Rajini Rao says:


    Jyoti Q Dahiya zucchini or courgette is turai/tori in Hindi..related to Cucumber family so it should cook very fast. Yellow squash is not kaddu (pumpkin), however. It looks like this: http://goo.gl/Lilm8Z


    Is there an Indian equivalent?

  43. Rajini Rao says:


    Michelle Beissel thanks for coming to my rescue with the detailed explanation. I’m sure now that I planted the non bulb type which is indeed lovely! 

  44. Deeksha Tare says:


    Rajini Rao not seen anything like the yellow squash in India… at least not in my part of the country.


    But yeah… looks yummy sounds cool! 🙂

  45. Rajini Rao says:


    Hi Deeksha Tare ! There are related veggies, though. For example, ridged gourd and also lauki (some sort of gourd)..both have a similar taste to squash and zucchini and would make excellent substitutes. 


  46. Nhammmm …. Nhammmm… 🙂

  47. Mary T says:


    Nom Nom!  This looks fabulous 🙂

  48. Rajini Rao says:


    Mara Rose I was just dipping into the Chez Panisse cookbook and thinking of you 🙂


    Hope you are well?

  49. Mary T says:


    I’m doing well Rajini Rao ~ Thanks for asking.  Ally is back to her sassy self and we are riding.  I’m happy you are enjoying the cookbook :-).

  50. Rajini Rao says:


    Wonderful news! I’m happiest when I cook 🙂


    (Okay, when I “science” too).

  51. Jim Gorycki says:


    Yum. Challah french toast!


  52. Just added you Rajini Rao among a few other specially selected friends to my private company profile. Just to make it easier to follow you further on … 🙂


    Dunno if I’ll share so much from this profile though … 🙂


    Sincerely The Crazy Vike


    Meeooow … :3

  53. llany59 says:


    Gracias Rajini, por compartir tu receta , voy a aprobar 

  54. Manda Sharp says:


    Looks delicious. Must try with my daughter.

  55. Pedro Olivo says:


    O my goodness that looks good!!!

  56. Rajini Rao says:


    Thank you, Pedro Olivo . I should have saved you some 🙂


  57. Congratulations to for goods, I seek the jobs, I’m moh’d Suleiman khalfan, from zanzibar Island


  58. Bjr.de quoi est composé votre recet? Svp merci😉

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