Shakespeare channeled by Gilmour.

Shakespeare channeled by Gilmour. Simply Beautiful . Thank you Feisal Kamil ! Sonnet 18 is arguably the best known and most beloved of Shakespeare’s 154 sonnets. Here it is being recorded at Astoria, David Gilmour’s houseboat on the Thames.

Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day?

Thou art more lovely and more temperate;

Rough winds do shake the darling buds of May,

And summer’s lease hath all too short a date;

Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines,

And often is his gold complexion dimm’d;

And every fair from fair sometime declines,

By chance or nature’s changing course untrimm’d;

But thy eternal summer shall not fade,

Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st;

Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade,

When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st:

So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,

So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.

–William Shakespeare

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19 Responses to Shakespeare channeled by Gilmour.

  1. Jim Douglas says:


    Or in terms an engineer can understand: http://xkcd.com/1026/

  2. Rajini Rao says:


    Haha, trust xkcd to come up with this 🙂

  3. Rickie B says:


    Sonnet 18 the most loved? A friend called Joanna Spencer always used to say sonnet 116 was his best – a meeting of minds? Rsv

  4. Rajini Rao says:


    Sonnet 130 is pretty well known and oft quoted: My mistress’ eyes are nothing like the sun.


    A reference to his Dark Lady.

  5. Rajini Rao says:


    Who knew, right Kimberly Brosnan ?


  6. Ok, put me in your music circle, #DavidGilmour is my FAV artist!

  7. Rajini Rao says:


    Done, Mike Phillips 🙂 Did you miss the fan fest yesterday on the event of Gilmour’s B-Day? This one was a find from the comment stream: https://plus.google.com/u/0/114601143134471609087/posts/aReQcA1hrRr


  8. Rajini Rao I DID!!! Thanks!!!

  9. Sherri Vance says:


    Oh, that just made me very happy. Thank you so much.

  10. Rajini Rao says:


    That is a lovely version, too Feisal Kamil . YouTube took me to a few more. Just heard Alan Rickman Reciting Sonnet 130. Too bad that the glorious Benedict Cumberbatch appears not to have recited Shakespeare, described on YouTube, “His voice is like a jaguar hidden inside a chocolate-covered cello lined with soft, diamond-incrusted velvet.” Mixed metaphors, but I get it 🙂


  11. So long as posts like this do make the stream,


    So long I leave my lights and cares, and dream.


  12. Was this post, by any chance, sparked off by yesterday’s xkcd?

  13. Rajini Rao says:


    Manish Goregaokar , Feisal actually posted this link along with the xkcd comic but I had not got around to listening until today.

  14. Rajini Rao says:


    Thank you, Feisal Kamil ! I have a tribute to First Women in Science and Tech coming up for International Women’s Day (it’s not tomorrow yet where I am..you know what I mean, haha).


  15. Awesome find and post, boss! What a voice Gilmour still has, I had no idea. Always nice to find a musician successfully put flare into the bard’s work (being a member of Pink Floyd makes it particularly special). One of my favorites has to be Sonnet 29 (For thy sweet love remember’d such wealth brings That then I scorn to change my state with kings’), and I actually like the way Rufus Wainwright performs it. The end could use a little work, but overall it’s quite catchy.


    Rufus Wainwright, Sonnet 29 (When, in disgrace), Spoleto Festival, June 26, 2010

  16. Chris Powell says:


    Brilliant and beautifully done. Thanks to both of you!


  17. great one to wake up to.


  18. What an amazing recording studio. A very nice song – although I feel he could have improved the meter to make ‘temperate’ fit better 😉

  19. Al Risden says:


    Still a master at his craft, after all these years.

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