So proud to live in the first county in the eastern US that has begun a curbside food scrap pickup that will…

So proud to live in the first county in the eastern US that has begun a curbside food scrap pickup that will “collect such material from potato peels to coffee grounds and turn them into rich, earthy compost suitable for the garden or the farm field.” Save on landfill and sewage treatment fees and keep the Chesapeake Bay clean! Go Green, Maryland! I’ve always wished I could compost food scraps effectively at home, but I confess to being squeamish about those wriggly worms.

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3 Responses to So proud to live in the first county in the eastern US that has begun a curbside food scrap pickup that will…

  1. Martha E Fay says:


    I compost in my backyard, but I don’t use worms. I’m not very effective at creating the compost – or using it – sometimes I wonder, should I auction some of it on e-bay?. I do sometimes use bokashi, which is some kind of enzyme stuff that can speed decomposition – especially helpful for use in the kitchen compost pail (takes care of that garbage smell). I’ve been thinking about adding meat scraps – I think the only reason that most people don’t is that they smell particularly bad as they decompose – but the bokashi seems to work.


    Don’t know whether bokashi is a brand name or generic.

  2. Rajini Rao says:


    Martha E Fay , great share, thanks. Have not tried the bokashi (generic Japanese term, I believe)..I see it is widely available. I compost yard waste in my backyard but hesitate putting food scraps out in case I attract all the critters from the neighboring woods. Don’t ask me how, but I once set my compost pile on fire..had to call in the fire dept. and all.

  3. Martha E Fay says:


    So far I have mainly used bokashi in my countertop container which often gets a little bit of meat or dairy. The online websites make it sound really hard, but ultimately, from what I’ve read, if I cut up the meat really tiny, layer a bit of bokashi with each addition, and make sure the container is airtight, I should be able to add it as is to my backyard compost (making sure it gets buried. But the amount of time it needs the anaerobic environment is unclear – possibly several weeks. Which means I’d need to get a bigger container, or perhaps one for vegetable scraps and one for meat and dairy. For now, I’ll try adding leftover meat and dairy to the veggie scraps (not that I have a lot of left-overs of those items) and see what happens.

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